Shooting an elephant mask of impeirialism

In fact, they could not build a real control on it.

Orwell’s

The crowd grew very still, and a deep, low, happy sigh, as of people who see the theatre curtain go up at last, breathed from innumerable throats. He was lying on his belly with arms crucified and head sharply twisted to one side. Here was I, the white man with his gun, standing in front of the unarmed native crowd — seemingly the leading actor of the piece; but in reality I was only an absurd puppet pushed to and fro by the will of those yellow faces behind.

George Orwell

It was perfectly clear to me what I ought to do. A simile is used to compare the blood of an elephant: As such, he is subjected to constant baiting and jeering by the local people.

With a strong interest in the lives of the working class, Orwell—born in India to a middle-class family, but brought up in Britain—held the post of assistant superintendent in the British Indian Imperial Police in Burma from to The imperialism was depicted clearly at the beginning.

With a strong interest in the lives of the working class, Orwell—born in India to a middle-class family, but brought up in Britain—held the post of Assistant Superintendent in the British Imperial Police in Burma from to The autobiographical narration makes the essay more agreeable and endearing.

In the story, Orwell clearly mentions that he does not want to shoot the elephant because it is not necessary in terms of safety of the people; he realizes that he is not in controls.

The narrator then leaves the beast, unable to be in its presence as it continues to suffer. Look at the following websites to help supplement your answers: Thus, George Orwell successfully sends the message of imperialism to his audience by using efficient styles of writing in his essay, Shooting an Elephant.

Orwell mentioned himself to be like an actor in a play. He becomes a sort of hollow, posing dummy, the conventionalized figure of a sahib. He later learns that it was stripped, nearly to the bone, within hours. Finally, to save the honor of him and that of other Europeans, Orwell decided to shoot the elephant.

It seemed to me that it would be murder to shoot him. Various Burmans stopped me on the way and told me about the elephant's doings.

He was tearing up bunches of grass, beating them against his knees to clean them and stuffing them into his mouth. I had halted on the road. Why do you always doubt his fucking word. I had no intention of shooting the elephant — I had merely sent for the rifle to defend myself if necessary — and it is always unnerving to have a crowd following you.

The people expected it of me and I had got to do it; I could feel their two thousand wills pressing me forward, irresistibly. This structure helps Orwell to intensify the shock and the reaction in the readers as the elephant starts dying. This indicates that empires do anything for their own pleasure as they feel delight when using and controlling weaken people.

Most of the corpses I have seen looked devilish. When I pulled the trigger I did not hear the bang or feel the kick — one never does when a shot goes home — but I heard the devilish roar of glee that went up from the crowd.

Its mahout, the only person who could manage it when it was in that state, had set out in pursuit, but had taken the wrong direction and was now twelve hours' journey away, and in the morning the elephant had suddenly reappeared in the town.

Orwell perceives that whether he shoots that elephant or not, he cannot change the thought of the natives about him, a European officer.

It was not, of course, a wild elephant, but a tame one which had gone "must. The decision to shoot the elephant proved the futility of the Europeans in the East. The sole thought in my mind was that if anything went wrong those two thousand Burmans would see me pursued, caught, trampled on and reduced to a grinning corpse like that Indian up the hill.

Metaphor- Read this passage: Left-wing critics see insufficient condemnation; conservative critics point out that it is the narrator, an agent of empire, who explicitly denounces the British presence as pervasively corrupting to both sides.

Shooting an Elephant

Somehow it always seems worse to kill a large animal. For it is the condition of his rule that he shall spend his life in trying to impress the "natives," and so in every crisis he has got to do what the "natives" expect of him. Irony …The sole thought in my mind was that if anything went wrong those two thousand Burmans would see me pursued, caught, trampled on and reduced to a grinning corpse like that Indian up the hill.

The image of the elephant is compared to the power of the British Empire. His face was coated with mud, the eyes wide open, the teeth bared and grinning with an expression of unendurable agony. The use of juxtaposition helps Orwell to show the situation of the imperialistic British Empire as powerless.

Shooting an Elephant is set in the British colony of Burma, which was annexed in and became part of the Empire in as a province of British India. "Shooting an Elephant" is the story of a British policeman in Moulmein, a city in Burma, that is torn between shooting or not shooting an elephant that has gone ramped.

The native people did not like him much, but when the elephant went on its rampage they were quick to call on him. In George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” Eric Arthur Blair, whose pen name was George Orwell, was a British author, novelist, essaying, and a critic.

George Orwell was a British Christian name, and Orwell was the name of a small river in East Anglia. As a wanderer, from time to time Orwell plunged the depth of society like an explorer%(1). George Orwell’s essay, Shooting an Elephant, deals with the evils of imperialism.

The unjust shooting of an elephant in Orwell’s story is the central focus from which Orwell builds his argument through the two dominant characters, the elephant and its executioner. Step 2: Each member of the group must read George Orwell's personal essay entitled "Shooting an Elephant." Step 3: Each person in the group will fulfill the necessary research for his or her role and create at least 4 PowerPoint slides each for his or her topic, as noted below.

Shooting the elephant demonstrates how imperialism has an effect on both the oppressors and the oppressed. The British police officers act corrupt in order to keep up with the appearance that they are justified to have power over the natives, essentially causing him to “ wear a mask,” (Orwell ).

Shooting an elephant mask of impeirialism
Rated 4/5 based on 8 review
Shooting an Elephant Quotes from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes